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Friday, June 12, 2009

Time for another list, and so:

The Five Creepiest (no offense) Aspects of the Rosary/Mariology For Sympathetic, But Questioning Protestants:

5. The Rosary's length and repetition. [Protestant Slogan: "Liturgy is Bad." And, "Anyone Who Prays The Same Thing Twice Is Up To Something."]

4. The Apostle's Creed. Apparently, even the US Catholic Bishops don't like "he descended into Hell" which has become "he descended to the dead." [Even the Reformed are generally comfortable with it, though we don't mean what we say when we say it.]

3. "Hail Mary, full of grace." Aside from this first line, everything else is objectively true and right from Scripture, mostly the words of Elizabeth, the mother of John the Baptist. (Naturally, one first must be comfortable talking with Mary and the other saints.) [Snark Alert: Has anyone ever pictured John as a Southern, American, suit-wearing, non-drinking, non-dancing Baptist while reading the Gospels? Or is that just me?]

2. The virtues allgedly cultivated by each of the Mysteries. How do we know this? Have all of the faithful practioners reported the same thing? What if I don't? Worse still, what if nothing at all happens?

1. The "Hail, Holy Queen." My Protestant brethren, if you think the Hail Mary is bad, this one takes the cake. I thought this was hyper-dulia, (veneration, respect) not latria, (worship, reserved for God alone) but I must confess, the distinction is hard to see practically. Catholics say that latria more specifically denotes sacrifice, which they do not offer to Mary or the other saints. I'll let you know if or when I am persuaded by this argument. [Underlying dogmatic problem: The notion that Mary was not a sinner. If you get square with that, it would seem, her co-redemptive place is assured.]

Bonus Note: If I do make all or part of the Rosary part of my devotional life, the Gloria Patri (The "Glory Be") will have to be sung. Thanks, Christ Our King Pres. It's just natural, and altogether right.

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Yesterday, my boy MDL had his 32nd birthday. Happy birthday, Chief. The same day as a girl from the early days of college that I've never gotten over. I might feel a tinge of sadness when she gets married, but most likely, I'll feel relief. We never actually dated or anything, but fellas, you know how it is. The feelings were nearly out of control. If I thought I had anything to offer her, I'd call her up right now. But it seems this will just be a wound I have to carry around. She's not the only girl I've felt things for, but she's the kind of woman you remember.
I feel this one deeper precisely because no one (apparently) is loving her. I hate that. When people get married, you let go of things. It's not so bad. But when the fair maidens remain maidens year after year, and often lament their state, even a confident man starts to doubt himself. You do what they do: you start to wonder if there's something wrong with you.
Neither is it hard to imagine oneself becoming angry and bitter, since it seems folks know what they want, they simply refuse to do what is necessary to end the present unhappiness. Maybe they're waiting on the "perfect guy" (substitute "godly" there, and you have the real main problem for those alleged vast hordes of lonely Christian women, in my frank opinion) or something. For most people, I'll say this: You're single because you want to be. What this means is that you've got hang-ups about the process itself, and you are blaming others to hide it.
I'm probably guilty myself, but I would submit that I've been trying, even if foolishly.